Miter Saw Table Stand Part 1

By Jeff | Dec. 05, 2012

I’m holding off on showing you the table, but I was able to get the proper tools and it’s coming along very nicely. What I wanted to talk about today though, was a miter saw table I’ve been building based off of these plans. Stands for miter saws can cost between $90 and $200 on Amazon and while they offer great portability, I wanted to build one mainly to save money and of course because I thought it would be a fun project. For about $40 worth of materials, this easy stand also has four compartments to store smaller work tools.

Materials

  • 1/4" x 4' x 8' Plywood
  • 10' 1 x 6 Board
  • 3x 8' 2 x 4 Studs
  • Nails or Screws and hardware to join everything.

Tools Used

  • Panel Saw (or have them cut it at the store)
  • Miter Saw
  • Clamps
  • Drill
  • Nail Gun (optional)
  • Square
  • Level
  • 2 Wrenches
  • Tape Measure
  • Safety Glasses / Earplugs

The first step was to measure the height, width, and depth of the saw. the width and depth don’t need to be exact, but the height needs to be super accurate to the place where you’ll put your materials or your table won’t line up with the saw. Unfortunately, I had some issues with this part which I’ll go into later.

If you don’t have access to a panel saw, you’ll want to have the person at the store rip and cut your plywood. Make sure to have one of the sections ripped 1/4" shorter than the other to allow for the back to be attached. I had them make the panels a little bit larger so I could do the cuts more accurately at TechShop but small enough they would still fit in the car.

I used the table saw to rip the plywood to 18" and 17.75" and the panel saw to cut a 24.5" section. I actually forgot to do this the first day, and had to drag the 8' piece back to make those two cuts.

I then cut the back out and ripped the 1 x 6 to what I thought would be the right height for my miter saw (3 11/16). Unfortunately, it wasn’t the right height, but I didn’t figure that out until I got home and tested the whole thing. Oblivious to my measurement error, I created a jig to cut the support beams into 17.75" sections.

My jig was created by measuring off 17.75" (18" minus the width of the back) and then clamping a piece of scrap material shown below to make the repetitive cuts quickly without having to remeasure each time.

Measuring for Drawers

When I got home the first day, I put everything together and realized that I had measured the supports 3/16th of an inch off. I’m still not quite sure how that happened, but when I went back to the shop to cut out the spot for the miter saw, I also ripped off a 3/16" strip and cut it into 17/75" sections to attach to the current supports. This way I wouldn’t have to go out and buy another 1 x 6.

The next phase of the project was nailing everything together. If you don’t have a nail gun, then you can just use a drill and some screws or a hammer and some regular nails. Since this is going in the workshop, it doesn’t have to look like professional quality furniture.

Miter Saw Table Setup

This is where I stand now, with the left side of the stand mostly nailed together and ready to finish up for next time.